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Crown Prosecution Service makes commitment to male victims of sexual and domestic abuse

CPS publishes first ever public statement ‘recognising the needs and experiences of male victims’

The Crown Prosecution Service has published its first ever public statement recognising the needs and experiences of male victims of offences including rape, domestic abuse, harassment, stalking and child sexual abuse.

The CPS says that many male victims of these crimes never come forward to report them to the police. This can be for a variety of reasons, including fear that their masculinity may appear to be diminished if they report domestic abuse or that homophobic assumptions will be made around their sexuality if they are raped by a man.

The CPS, which says that it has always been committed to securing justice for all victims, both male and female, and applies policies fairly and equally, has worked with groups which represent the interests of male victims to explore the issues they face in relation to these offences.

The new CPS public statement sets out:

The Director of Public Prosecutions, Alison Saunders, said:

"The way society views masculinity can make it very difficult for men and boys who are the victims of sexual and domestic offences to come forward.

"This 'public statement' formalises the CPS commitment to male victims and recognises that stereotypes of masculinity and femininity can, and do, feed sexist and homophobic assumptions. These can deter male victims from reporting abuse and pursuing a prosecution.

"The statement addresses this challenge and I hope it will create an environment that gives male victims increased confidence to come forward and get the justice they deserve."

The statement forms part of the CPS revised Violence Against Women and Girls (VAWG) Strategy 2017-2020 which outlines the CPS's approach to all VAWG Crimes.

The CPS, in line with the United Nations conventions, ratified by the Government, states that these crimes have a disproportionate number of female victims, hence the continued use of the term "VAWG". However, the CPS also recognises the experience of male victims and the distressing impact on them.

For the CPS public statement, click here.

8/9/17