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Disabled people more likely to suffer domestic abuse than non-disabled

Latest data from the Office for National Statistics shows that in the year ending March 2020, around one in seven (14.3 per cent) disabled people aged 16 to 59 years experienced some form of domestic abuse in England and Wales, significantly higher when compared with one in 20 (5.1 per cent) for non-disabled people of the same age. Similar proportions for both groups were observed in the year ending March 2019.

Disabled women (17.5 per cent) were more than twice as likely to experience domestic abuse than non-disabled women (6.7 per cent), a significant difference. While disabled men (9.2 per cent) were significantly less likely to experience domestic abuse than disabled women, they were more than twice as likely to have experienced domestic abuse than non-disabled men (3.6 per cent), a significant difference.

Disabled people were significantly more likely to experience domestic abuse than non-disabled people, regardless of age. Disabled people aged 16 to 24 years were almost three times more likely to have experienced any form of domestic abuse in the last year (19.5 per cent) than non-disabled people of the same age (7.3 per cent).

The experience of domestic abuse also varied with impairment type, though the variability of the estimates indicates comparisons between impairment types should be made with caution. In the year ending March 2020, disabled people aged 16 to 59 years who reported a mental health (20.5 per cent), a social or behavioural (20.0 per cent) or a learning impairment (19.1 per cent) tended to have experienced the highest levels of domestic abuse in the last year.

For the full data, click here.

28/2/21